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ORIGINAL AND CERTIFIED URPRO FILTER INSTRUCTIONS
Optical Glass and Optical Plastic

URPRO SWCY Filter
(shallow blue-green tropical fresh and salt water)

URPRO CY Filter
(tropical blue-green water)

URPRO GR Filter
(green algae fresh/salt water)

Proven Techniques
(for still, video, and cine imaging)


URPRO SWCY Filter Instructions
WHICH URPRO FILTER?

Use the URPRO SWCY filter with available light in shallow blue-green tropical fresh and salt water. (SW = Shallow Water ~ CY = tropical blue green water) The SWCY filter is ideal for ALL video, digital, still, and cine camera systems. This screw-mount filter is available in optical glass only, and in most popular sizes.

Use the URPRO CY Filter with available light, and/or electronic flash in tropical blue green fresh and salt water. Ideal for ALL video, digital, still, and cine camera systems. This filter is available in optical glass and optical plastic in most standard sizes. (CY = tropical blue green fresh and salt water)

Use the URPRO GR filter with available light and/or electronic flash in green algae fresh and salt water. Ideal for ALL video, digital, still, and cine camera systems. This filter is available in optical glass and optical plastic in most standard sizes. (GR = green algae fresh and salt water)

These URPRO filters are distinctly different and cannot be interchanged.

 

INTRODUCTION
WATER IS A NATURAL FILTER

Full spectrum colors exist underwater at great depths. Without a URPRO color correction filter, these natural underwater hues become “distorted/changed” when seen by the human eye, or attempts are made to record images using film cameras or electronic cameras. This “color shift” happens because water is a natural filter altering the wavelengths of light as it passes through the water. The deeper the water, the greater the color shift.

The proven URPRO filter technologies restore the underwater hues by "neutralizing” the different and dominant false masking colors as light passes through the water. Using sunlight only, URPRO filters allow the natural colors –already there— to be seen by the eye and recorded electronically or captured on film

The URPRO SWCY optical glass filter is scientifically designed to insure optimal light transmission characteristics. This filter corrects colors using natural sunlight in shallow water and is designed to be used with ALL video, digital, still, and cine camera systems.

 

SWCY EFFECTIVE DEPTH RANGE

The URPRO SWCY filters are also designed for use with natural sunlight at depths slightly below the surface, to a maximum of 25 feet/4 meters.

[For color correction at greater depths, use the URPRO CY filters. The URPRO CY filters are designed to be used at depths between 12 feet/4 meters and 50 feet/17 meters, or greater depths, depending upon local conditions.]

 

VISUAL APPEARANCE OF URPRO SWCY FILTERS

The URPRO SWCY filters visually “appear identical” to the URPRO CY filters. However, these two URPRO filters are distinctly different and cannot be interchanged.

 

SWCY FILTER POSITION

This URPRO filter can be positioned in front of the underwater housing or inside of the housing. The filter can also be mounted on the front of the prime lens of the camera or wide-angle adapter. URPRO filters can also be “sandwiched between” the prime lens and wide-angle adapter.

 

SWCY EXPOSURE FACTORS

On the surface, the URPRO SWCY filter will have approximately a 1-F/stop light loss. When using cameras with automatic exposure capabilities, there is NO exposure compensation required because automatic systems calculate the light loss.

When a separate light meter is used to determine the exposure, it is suggested the light meter’s ASA/ISO Setting compensate for the light loss. (See Practical Examples, next column.)

 

EXPOSURE COMPENSATION:
PRACTICAL EXAMPLES

ASA/ISO 200 original film rating
= ASA/ISO 100 “adjusted” film rating caused by the SWCY filter light loss

ASA/ISO 400 original film rating
=ASA/ISO 200 “adjusted” film rating caused by the SWCY filter light loss

 

IF no light meter is used, a one F/stop light reduction must be calculated into the exposure to prevent under-exposed images. Under all circumstances, an “exposure test(s)” is strongly encouraged.

 

MIXING DIFFERENT LIGHT SOURCES

Do NOT use the URPRO SWCY filter with electronic flash. Light sources different than natural sunlight will produce unsatisfactory colors and images.

Under certain conditions, it may be possible to mix diffused 3200 Kelvin video light with sunlight and the SWCY filter. Under all circumstances, a “color balance test(s)” is strongly encouraged.

When mixing sunlight and 3200 Kelvin video light, the sunlight must be the main light source while the video light provides “fill light” to the darker parts of the scene. The video light should be directly above the center of the camera lens and pointing slightly downward to help simulate natural sunlight.

 

CLEANING/CARE OF URPRO SWCY FILTERS

The URPRO SWCY filters are made of high quality optical glass and are mounted in filter rings made of black anodized aluminum. When imaging in saltwater, the filters should be thoroughly rinsed with fresh water and gently dried with a soft absorbent cloth. Although he URPRO optical glass filters can break, they are difficult to scratch and should always receive the same degree of attention given to other premium optical products.

 

UNDERWATER FILTER DISTANCE
SWCY FILTERS ONLY

Photographically and visually, the natural blue green (cyan) effects of the water dominate reds, oranges and other warm colors. This happens because water is denser than air, and because water also acts as a natural filter. Consequently, the deeper an underwater imager goes beneath the surface, the greater the colors are “filtered out” of the spectrum.

To select the correct URPRO filter for the proper depths, and to compensate for the loss of colors, the depth of the water must be added to the distance between the camera and the subject. This combination of numbers yields the Underwater Filter Distance.

Using natural sunlight only, the URPRO SWCY filter yields the best colors when used just below the surface of the water, and when the camera to subject distance combination is less than 25 feet/8 meters.

Use the following formula to determine the correct Underwater Filter Distance for the URPRO SWCY filters.

 

IF the Underwater Filter Distance is greater than 25 feet/8 meters, use the URPRO CY correction filter which is designed to restore the color spectrum for depths between 10 feet/3 meters and 60 feet/20 meters.

SWCY Filters are ideal for ALL still, video, digital and cine camera systems.


URPRO CY Filter Instructions
WHICH URPRO FILTER?
  • Use the URPRO CY filter with available light and/or electronic flash in BLUE-GREEN tropical fresh and salt water. Ideal for ALL still, video and movie camera systems.
  • Use the URPRO GR filter with available light and/or electronic flash in GREEN algae fresh and salt water. Ideal for ALL still, video and movie camera systems.
  • Use the URPRO VLF filter with available light and/or video lights in BLUE-GREEN fresh and salt water. Ideal for ALL underwater video and movie camera systems. This URPRO filter is very effective in shallow water using available light.

 

URPRO CY CAMERA FILTERS
INTRODUCTION

This URPRO CY filter is the world's only scientifically designed underwater color-correcting filter created specifically to correct colors in Caribbean or tropical blue-green (cyan) water. With sunlight and the URPRO filter, corals, fish and underwater life are accurately recorded in natural breathtaking beauty. The filter neutralizes the "underwater blues" so that the true colors with already exist are easily recorded on all films and video. (Reds, oranges and yellows usually exist at depths past 50-100 feet!)

The URPRO filter is PATENTED for its ability to accurately record colors underwater at depth of 60-80 feet (frequently to 100 feet or more) with color negative films and video, and to depth of 30-50 feet using color slide films.

The URPRO filter used in blue-green (cyan) ocean water and direct sunlight will yield the best results. Conditions at the same location vary, often significantly. The results produced by the URPRO filter will depend upon specific water and light conditions.


HOW TO USE THE URPRO CY FILTER

The URPRO CY filter is easy to use and is available in almost every standard or custom size. The 58mm and 67mm CY filters thread directly on the font of the Nikonos camera, the filter MUST be screwed into the font of the lens when the camera is in the water to prevent possible implosion of the filter!

 

-Special Notice-
URPRO OPTICAL PLASTIC

The URPRO Optical Glass and URPRO Optical Plastic filters provide identical full spectrum underwater color correction! The URPRO optical plastic anti-scratch coating and optical surfaces, however, require gentle care and special handling!

  • NOTE: Perhaps visible when dry, "MINOR FILTER SCRATCHES" will "DISAPPEAR" when the filter is underwater and will NOT affect the image quality because the special URPRO lens material has the same retractive index as water.
  • NOTE: After each dive immediately rinse URPRO Optical Plastic filters with fresh water and GENTLY dry with a SOFT CLOTH. Always clean/wipe the filter surfaces when they are wet.
  • NOTE: Do NOT use URPRO Optical Plastic filters in any swimming pool containing chlorine.
  • NOTE: Do NOT clean any URPRO Optical Plastic filter with lens cleaner, solvents and/or abrasives of any kind.

 

DETERMINE THE CORRECT EXPOSURE

On the surface, the URPRO CY filter has about a one f/stop light loss. When the filter is placed on the camera lens inside of an underwater housing using a through-the-lens (TTL) exposure system, either automatic or manual NO ASA or f/stop compensation in necessary. The TTL meter system will compensate for the light loss.

When a separate light meter is used to determine exposure, it is suggested the light meter (ASA setting) compensate for the light loss caused by the filter (see examples below).

If no light meter is used, a one f/stop light loss must be calculated into the exposure system to prevent underexposure. Under all circumstances, at least on test roll is suggested.


PRACTICAL EXAMPLES

          • ASA 200 (original film rating suggest by manufacturer)
          • ASA 100 ("adjusted" film rating caused by filter light loss)
          • ASA 400 (original film rating suggest by manufacturer)
          • ASA 200 ("adjusted" film rating caused by filter light loss)

 


USING STROBE LIGHT AND URPRO FILTERS

Any URPRO CY or GR filter can be used easily and effectively with daylight and strobe light! It is suggested the strobe light be one f/stop less than the metered available light, i.e., he strobe light acts as a "fill light."

When using a normal lens or wide-angle lens, the strobe light must be at least 6 measured feet from the subject to insure proper color balance.

To prevent "hot spots," the angle of light coverage form the strobe unit must have the same angle of coverage as the camera lens. Strobe light will be most effective on night dives, cave dives or wall dives filled with heavy shadows.

 


USING MOVE/VIDEO LIGHT AND URPRO CY FILTERS

Movie/video lights are not recommended for use with the URPRO CY filters because they each have different color temperatures (i.e., daylight is 5800K and movie/video lights are 3200K).

Movie/video lights will be most effective without the filter on night dives, cave dives, or wall dives filled with heavy shadows.

 


UNDERWATER FILTER DISTANCE

Photographically and visually reds, oranges and other warm colors become dominated by the natural blue-green (cyan) effects of the water when it is more than 8-10 feet deep.

Because all water is a continuous filter, the deeper a subsea photographer goes beneath the surface, the more colors are naturally "filtered out" of the spectrum.

As a result, the depth of the water must be added to the distance between the camera (or flash) and the subject to give the underwater filter distance. Use the following formula to determine the correct underwater filter distance:

+ Depth of water above the photographer
+ Distance from camera (or flash) to subject

= Underwater filter distance

PRACTICAL EXAMPLES

For snorkelers using an underwater camera, the subject must be more than 8 feet from the camera, but less than 25 feet from the camera.

Scuba divers using a still camera or a movie camera must combine the depth of the water plus the distance of the camera from the subject. This sum should not exceed 80 feet for color negative films and video, and should not exceed 30 feet for color slides. In all cases, the best color is achieved when the camera is close to the subject!

 


PROPER FILM SELECTION

Use fast films! Use ASA 200, ASA 400 or even ASA 1000 films with available light photography. Fast films increase the depth of field and pictures because of camera and subject movement.

Try color negative films rather than slide films! The color negative films which produce color prints also produce color slides and enlarged transparencies. Color negative films have considerable more exposure latitude than slide films, plus they can be color balanced.

To insure the best color balance with color negative films, shoot and process the film normally. When the prints or transparencies are made from the negatives, have all the color cyan (blue-green) removed.



URPRO GR Filter Instructions

WHICH URPRO FILTER?

Use the URPRO GR filter with available light and/or electronic flash in GREEN algae fresh and salt water. Ideal for ALL still, video and movie camera systems.

Use the URPRO CY filter with available light and/or electronic flash in BLUE-GREEN tropical fresh and salt water. Ideal for ALL still, video and movie camera systems.


INTRODUCTION
URPRO GR CAMERA FILTERS

This URPRO GR filter is the world's only scientifically designed underwater color-correcting filter created specifically to correct colors in green salt and fresh waters. With sunlight and the URPRO GR filter, you capture the natural colors of ocean corals, fish and aquatic life in lakes, streams and rivers.

This URPRO GR filter "neutralizes" the underwater green colors so that the true colors which already exist can be recorded on film or video. This filter is based upon proven patented technology for its ability to correct colors underwater.

 


-Special Notice-
URPRO OPTICAL PLASTIC

The URPRO Optical Glass and URPRO Optical Plastic filters provide identical full spectrum underwater color correction! The URPRO optical plastic anti-scratch coating and optical surfaces, however, require gentle care and special handling!

  • NOTE: Perhaps visible when dry, "MINOR FILTER SCRATCHES" will "DISAPPEAR" when the filter is underwater and will NOT affect the image quality because the special URPRO lens material has the same retractive index as water.
  • NOTE: After each dive immediately rinse URPRO Optical Plastic filters with fresh water and GENTLY dry with a SOFT CLOTH. Always clean/wipe the filter surfaces when they are wet.
  • NOTE: Do NOT use URPRO Optical Plastic filters in any swimming pool containing chlorine.
  • NOTE: Do NOT clean any URPRO Optical Plastic filter with lens cleaner, solvents and/or abrasives of any kind.

 


HOW TO USE THE URPRO GR FILTER

The URPRO GR filter is easy to use and is available in almost every standard or custom size. The 58 mm and 67 mm GR filters thread directly on the front of the Nikonos lenses. When a URPRO GR filter is used on a Nikonos camera, the filter MUST be screwed into the front of the lens when the camera is in the water to prevent possible implosion of the filter!

 


DETERMINE THE CORRECT EXPOSURE

On the surface, the URPRO GR filter has about a one f/stop light loss. When the filter is places on the camera lens inside of an underwater housing using a through-the-lens (TTL) exposure system, either automatic or manual, NO ASA of f/stop compensation is necessary. The TTL meter system will compensate for the light loss.

When a separate light meter is used to determine exposure, it is suggested the light meter (ASA setting) compensate for the light loss caused by the filter (see examples below). If no light meter is used, a one f/stop light loss must be calculated into the exposure system to prevent underexposure. Under all circumstances, at least on test roll is suggested.


PRACTICAL EXAMPLES

          • ASA 200 (original film rating suggested by manufacturer)
          • ASA 100 ("adjusted" film rating caused by filter light loss)
          • ASA 400 (original film rating suggested by manufacturer)
          • ASA 200 ("adjusted" film rating caused by filter light loss)

 


USING STROBE LIGHT AND URPRO FILTERS

Any URPRO CY or URPRO GR filter can be used easily and effectively with daylight and strobe light! It is suggested the strobe light be one f/stop less than the metered available light, i.e., the strobe light acts as a "fill light." When using a normal lens or a wide-angle lens, the strobe lights must be at least 6 measured feet from the subject to insure proper color balance.

To prevent "hot spots," the angle of light coverage form the strobe unit must have the same angle of coverage as the camera lens. Strobe light will be most effective on night dives, cave dives, or wall dives filled with heavy shadows.

 


USING MOVIE/VIDEO LIGHTS AND URPRO GR FILTERS

Movie/video lights are not recommended for use with the URPRO GR filters because they each have different color temperatures (i.e., daylight is 5800 Kelvin and movie/video lights are 3200 Kelvin)

Movie/Video lights will be most effective without the filter on night dives, cave dives, or wall dives filled with heavy shadows.

 


UNDERWATER FILTER DISTANCE

Photographically and visually, reds, oranges and other warm colors become dominated by the natural green (algae) effects of the water just a few feet below the surface.

Because all water is a continuous filter, the deeper a subsea photographer goes beneath the surface, the more colors are naturally "filtered out" of the spectrum.

As a result, the depth of the water must be added to the distance between the camera (or flash) and the subject to give the underwater filter distance. Use the following formula to determine the correct underwater filter distance:

+ Depth of water above the photographer
+ Distance from camera (or flash) to subject

= Underwater filter distance

PRACTICAL EXAMPLES
For Best Color Correction

For snorkelers using an underwater camera, the subject must be more than 8 feet from the camera, but less than 25 feet from the camera

Scuba divers using a camera must combine the depth of the water plus the distance of the camera from the subject. This sum should not exceed 80 feet fro color negative films and video, and should not exceed 30 feet for color slides. In call cases, the best color is achieved when the camera is close to the subject!

*The color-balancing ability of the URPRO GR filter is determined by the amount of algae suspended in the water. Algae is a physically large particle(like sediment) which simultaneously reduces the visibility and the volume of light while it "colors" the water green.

 

PROPER FILM SELECTION

Use fast films! Use ASA 200, ASA 400 or even ASA 1000 films with available light photography. Fast film increase the depth of field and allow faster shutter speeds which reduce "fuzzy" pictures because of camera movement.

Try color negative films rather than slide films! The color negative films which produce color prints also produce color slides and enlarged transparencies. Color negative films have considerably more exposure latitude than slide films, plus they can be color balanced.

To insure the best color balance with negative films, shoot and process the film normally. When the prints or transparencies are made from the negatives, have all of th color green (plus occasionally blue green) removed.



PROVEN URPRO TIPS FOR BETTER IMAGES
  1. Know your camera. Understand how it works, the meaning of the numbers on the lens, and the vocabulary used by photographers. The more you understand about photography, the more successful your underwater pictures will be.
  2. Make a conscious effort to hold the camera still at all shutter speeds. This is the single biggest problem in underwater available light photography! Movement of any kind causes blurred images. Traditionally, the short burst of light from an electronic flash (1/125 second to about 1/10,000) camouflages camera movement while it creates unnatural black backgrounds even though the picture was taken in bright sunlight! Use negative buoyancy to rest securely on the bottom to hold the camera still.
  3. Select the correct shutter speed for the correct subject. For available light photography, use a faster shutter speed (1/60 second, 1/125 second or 1/250 second) for fast moving objects such as fish. Use slower shutter speeds (1/8 second, 1/15 second, or 1/30 second) for non-moving subjects such as coral or underwater scenes.
  4. Focus accurately. Understand distanced underwater. The eye sees and the camera records on film the apparent distance. Subjects which are six feet away (real distance) appear four feet away (apparent distance> because subjects underwater are magnified about 1/3 their original size.
  5. Know depth of field for any given f/stop. Depth of field is the distance in front of and behind the subject which is in sharp focus. The depth of field is the greatest with the smallest lens opening (f/22 or f/16). The depth of field is the shortest with the largest lens opening (f/2.5> or f/4).
  6. Use an underwater light meter for the best exposures. Exposure readings taken from an underwater grey card (18% reflectance) yield the most consistent exposures. A grey card is a matte-surface material which yields the reflectance (18%) of an "average scene," i.e., averaging the dark and light areas within the scene. All types of light meters are calibrated to read 18% grey reflectance.
    Move close to the subject to take the exposure reading, but do not cast a shadow. Check light meter readings for each subject. Different subjects reflect different amounts of light, even though the amount of light falling on the subject is the same. Take light meter readings at each different depth, and frequently at the same depth.
  7. Choose a fast film speed- ASA 200, ASA 1000 for fast-moving subjects and in greater depths of water. Choose a slow speed- ASA 64 or ASA 24- for shallower depth of water or slower-moving subjects. The higher the ASA number, the faster the shutter speed and/or the greater depth of field.
  8. See creatively. Plan and compose each picture before shooting. Approach an elusive subject slowly. Don't chase it.
  9. Best color is achieved when the camera is close to the subject!
  10. Enjoy! Enjoy! Enjoy!

            

 


URPRO FILTERS, P.O. BOX 455, NAPERVILLE, IL 60566 U.S.A
Phone: + 1-630-357-1646 • Fax: + 1-630-961-2622 OR + 1-630-778-0459.

 
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